Making Implicit Memory Explicit in Trauma Treatment

All too much of the trauma nightmare is lived out beneath conscious awareness and beyond conscious control.

 

Ruth Lanius & Sebern Fisher



Live discussion, two hours long, beginning with lecture/instruction by Dr. Ruth Lanius. These meetings feature clinicians from the lively EEGer community, exploring how neuroscience and therapy can illuminate new ways to help recovery from trauma.

Join Ruth Lanius & Sebern Fisher in this conversation

 

In this third conversation (earlier recordings are available), this one about implicit memory and the unconscious, Ruth Lanius and Sebern Fisher continue to explore therapy and trauma.

In particular, research carried out by Dr. Ruth Lanius and her group has focused on the way traumatic images trigger the brains of traumatized people.  Images are presented for a few milliseconds only and cannot be consciously perceived. However, the brain registers and responds.

Researchers saw activation of reptilian structures, the PAG and the Superior Colliculus as well as striking effects on heart rate variability, a reliable measure of emotional reactivity.  These brain structures help an individual react reflexively to threat and as part of our innate threat response are a key component of the implicit memory system. As participants will learn, the neurophysiological response of those affected by trauma and those not affected is entirely different.

This research certifies what trauma survivors and trauma therapists already know: all too much of the trauma nightmare is lived out beneath conscious awareness and beyond conscious control.

So what do these findings mean for treatment? How do we quiet the nightmare as it becomes more consciously available? Ruth and Sebern will discuss these questions and encourage you to participate in what is always an interesting and lively conversation. Dr. Lanius will present her research and Sebern Fisher will focus on the implications of her findings for neurofeedback and psychotherapy, as well as for body-oriented interventions and mindfulness practices.

 

This session is open to anyone interested, there is no pre-requisite to join this 2 hour conversation except perhaps your curiosity and willingness to learn.Register here.

USD $59

Trauma, Development, and the Brain

The Neuroscience of Trauma and Neglect and the Vital Role of Neurofeedback in Treatment.

Why this conversation is important if you want to understand trauma?

Sebern Fisher discusses why everyone -- not just therapists -- recovering or helping someone recover from trauma needs to hear Ruth Lanius discuss her ground-breaking research.

 

Ruth Lanius & Sebern Fisher



These meetings feature clinicians from the lively EEGer community, exploring how neuroscience and therapy can illuminate new ways to help recovery from trauma.